Browse Stories in Culture

Written by Susana on Sep 28, 2010
Sarah Brannon was 29 when she was diagnosed with cancer. It’s a day she remembers well. It was 2008, a Thursday at 3 p.m., and her doctor delivered the news: the mysterious aches, sweats and weight loss she had been experiencing were the cause of Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system.  “Everybody said ‘but you’re too young!‘ “ said Brannon, now 31 and in remission.
Written by David McLemore on Sep 16, 2010
It’s a hot day and there isn’t a breath of cooling wind among the ruins of the Hot Wells bath house.
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Sep 14, 2010
Check out this glimpse of the NOWCastSA.com team at work on the story of Hot Wells, the legendary bath house and resort that thrived in San Antonio during the late 1800s and early part of the 20th Century.Journalist David McLemore describes the ruins while video producer Antonio Rodriguez shoots images for the story package. Also on-site that day are NOWCastSA Web producer Heather DiMasi and Intern Andrew Delgado.This video was taken by NOWCastSA.com Project Coordinator Charlotte-Anne Lucas, using a Nokia N-95 on Friday, Sept. 10.
Written by Susan Finch on Sep 11, 2010
 A federal appeals court panel rejected claims by two San Antonio organizations who said the city's 2008 parade permit ordinance violates their free speech rights by charging them fees that other groups don't have to pay.In their 39-page decision, three 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges ruled Sept. 8 that the parade permit ordinance is constituional as written. Their conclusion dealt a setback to the San Antonio Free Speech Coalition and International Women's Day March Planning Committee, which sued to stop enforcement of the parade law.
Written by David McLemore on Sep 09, 2010
It was the day when everything changed. The terrorist attacks on U.S. soil nine years ago on September 11 shocked the world and put America on the front lines of the war on terrorism.On this ninth anniversary, as the nation pauses in solemn remembrance, each of us will recall what we did that day, how we wept and grew angry and became a little less certain of the future. And, perhaps, look for a way to reconnect that day of tragedy to somehow making the world a little better.