Browse Stories in Politics

Written by Texas Tribune on May 14, 2018
By Alexa Ura and Emma Platoff, The Texas Tribune From Jacquelyn Callanen’s perch in the Bexar County elections office, the period following Texas’ voter registration deadlines is best described as a paper tsunami. Some of it arrives by mail. Some stacks are delivered by volunteer voter registrars. The secretary of state’s office sends over a handful of boxes filled to the brim.
Written by Cynthia Spielman on May 03, 2018
By Cynthia Spielman and Cosima Colvin Neighborhood Plans are civic engagement and grassroots democracy at its most local level. They were created by ordinary people who care about their community and were willing to work, to participate and to engage with their neighbors in a real partnership with the city under the 1998 Community Building and Neighborhood Planning Program.   We spent hundreds of hours planning, facilitating and attending meetings. We talked to one another, and sometimes struggled with ideas until we finally came to a consensus.
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Apr 27, 2018
Nearly 50 residents gathered to remove and replace the Government Hill Alliance Board of Directors in a meeting at St. Patrick's Catholic Church that was carefully scripted and orderly. Organizers said they were motivated by concern over development in the historic neighborhood and a lack of transparency by the previous board. Watch full video of the meeting here, and scroll down to read more about the meeting.
Written by Beth Graham on Apr 20, 2018
Residents of the near-downtown Mahncke Park Neighborhood Association were surprised and upset when a city planner told them the SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan process would discard their long-standing and detailed Neighborhood Plan, developed at the city’s request.
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Apr 20, 2018
In direct contradiction of a city ordinance and the promise of the SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan, city staffers are systematically eliminating long-standing neighborhood plans designed to protect the character and future of San Antonio’s urban core communities. The news came as an unwelcome surprise to city council members at the Comprehensive Plan Committee’s April 19 meeting where they were being briefed on the $1.05 million SA Tomorrow Year Two consulting contract that is up for approval in May.