Written by Rebecca Espinoza on Jun 17 2020 - 5:25pm
  Come out to caravan through Potranco Rd. neighborhoods outside 1604 in solidarity with our black community. This is a family-friendly, peaceful protest as well as a COVID friendly one. Decorate your car with signs and posters in support of Black Lives Matter, honoring victims of police brutality, calls to reform the police departments, calls for social justice reform, speaking out against institutional racism, etc. 
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Jun 19 2018 - 2:55pm
San Antonio Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller said the separation of immigrant families at the border "is immoral, is evil, is sinful." His remarks came at the COPS/Metro Alliance Assembly on June 18, 2018, at Our Lady of the Lake University. "To use children as pawns to deter people from coming is inhuman and shows the decadence that we are in, in our country," he said.
Written by Jason Gil on Apr 11 2018 - 3:04pm
To see and feel the anguish of a Syrian child refugee, look no further than the Portraits of Compassion exhibit on the walls of the banquet hall at San Antonio’s Trinity Baptist Church, on view until the end of April 2018. The painting, titled “...the least of these...,” is a hauntingly poignant portrait of a Syrian child. His eyes beseech us, in their sad determined gaze, to seek our humanity, wondering what went wrong.
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Jun 14 2016 - 5:33pm
Kelly Allen, a passionate and tireless advocate for immigrants and social justice, died on June 5, 2016 after suffering a stroke. As pastor of San Antonio’s University Presbyterian Church, Allen helped form the Interfaith Welcome Coalition, a humanitarian response to the women and children fleeing deadly violence and poverty in Central America and seeking asylum in the United States.
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Apr 19 2016 - 6:14pm
Replay: As part of the Kennedy Library Forum series, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro discussed social justice issues and current initiatives to expand opportunity for all Americans.
Written by Cary Clack on Feb 22 2016 - 9:38pm
There is no position in the United States government called “Secretary of Next.” The Founding Fathers had little or no use for the word “next.” The Constitution they created is a real time manual delegating and explaining powers for those in office. It doesn’t instruct officeholders to not use a power until a successor, the next one, is sworn in.
Written by Cary Clack on Jan 18 2016 - 10:16am
“Let me say that if you are tired of demonstrations, I am tired of demonstrating. I am tired of the threat of death. I want to live.” Martin Luther King Jr., in Chicago during the campaign for open housing, Aug. 17, 1966 The threat would be fulfilled. Martin Luther King Jr. would be dead in less than two years. Exhausted and besieged, his last breath drawn on a balcony in Memphis in the midst of more demonstrations. Prophets are best appreciated when they’re martyrs.
Written by Oblate School … on Sep 27 2015 - 9:15pm
The Oblate Institute for the Study of Contemporary Spirituality today announced its first initiative on social justice, Dorothy Day for Today, A Contemporary Model of Compassion in Action: Spirituality, Social Justice and Ethics. The new forum will be the first social justice conference in Texas that will foster an ongoing dialogue in spirituality and social justice. 
Written by CharlotteAnne Lucas on Sep 1 2015 - 7:56pm
When civil rights leader and social activist Julian Bond died recently, the New York Times referred to him as a “persistent opponent of the stubborn remnants of white supremacy.” President Barack Obama called Bond a friend and a hero. "Justice and equality was the mission that spanned his life,” Obama said. While Julian Bond was a legendary figure beginning in the 1960s, some young people may have no idea who he is or how his life relates to the #blacklivesmatters movement.